HRPR Twitter Challenge!

Posted on: September 27th, 2011   No Comments

With 10 days left until the provincial election, the Poverty Roundtable has issued a challenge to all local provincial candidates.

Today in Hamilton there are approximately 62,000 individuals – children, women and men – struggling while in receipt of Ontario’s social assistance programs.  People whose stories are often not heard, voters whose concerns are often not raised.  At our last Roundtable meeting, we were hoping to both engage voters and utilize social media to engage in a community dialogue around social assistance reform.  We think we’ve found a creative way to do both.

The Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction is asking all Hamilton area provincial election candidates to indicate their support for social assistance reform in Ontario through a simple statement issued to their followers on Twitter by this Thursday, September 29th:  @hamiltonpoverty If elected, I will work to reform social assistance in Ontario #sareview #VoteOn

Candidates who do not have twitter accounts, can send a short statement via other means to the Roundtable.  We’re hoping to generate some community discussion. As of early this afternoon four local candidates had already taken up the ‘Twitter-pledge’.  For more info, please see the media statement attached.  You can also follow us on Twitter @hamiltonpoverty – and see who takes up the challenge.  Feel free to re-tweet to your friends as well.

The above information supplied by Tom Cooper, Director of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction.

 

NOTE from twitter account of @hamiltonpoverty:  So far 9 #HamOnt #VoteOn candidates have tweeted 4 social assist. reform incl. a Communist & a Libertarian www.hamiltonpoverty.ca/challenge

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